<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">i’m probably the last person to figure it out, but just in case someone else missed it, wanted to share with the group.</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">sometimes a client wants me to securely erase their old hard drive. no problem. i boot with a knoppix stick, use the dd command to write zeros to the entire disk.</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">well, turns out that doesn’t work with an SSD.</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">see article here for an explanation</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""><a href="http://lifehacker.com/how-to-securely-erase-a-solid-state-drive-on-mac-os-x-1580603733" class="">http://lifehacker.com/how-to-securely-erase-a-solid-state-drive-on-mac-os-x-1580603733</a></div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">i paid $9 for the partition magic iso mentioned in the article. partition magic is a linux distro, fits on a 1G USB stick.</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">used partition magic to zero out a 240GB SSD (Samsung EVO 840). using the SSD internal command to zero the disk took less than 2 seconds. i used hexedit to verify some random blocks were zero’d out.</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""><br class=""></div></body></html>