<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:'courier new',monospace;font-size:small">​When I first remember digitized audio back on a apple ][ in 1982 time frame it was horrible, not even close to cassette tape even.​ But digital audio progressed up until the representation storage and reproduction (D2A chips) matched the real thing (limited in audio realm by reproduction of speakers vs. real instruments).</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:'courier new',monospace;font-size:small">In video, the screen, storage and D2A will a keep increasing until (except for the display limits with respect to pure light and contrast), the reproduced video is as close to the real thing as possible. I sit 2 feet away from my 4K 40" philips, and it has no where near the resolution i see when I peer out to the side of the monitor and look at "real things" with detailed surface textures and specular highlights. 8K would be nice over 4K, but I think the reproduction will start to get closer to "the real thing" at 16 32 or even I would guess when 64K is out, which hopefully will be soon i hope :) but seriously, I would hope 64k video is out in next 10-20 years, before my eyes get old and dim. You know you will have achieved reasonably good video res. when with one eye closed, just seeing through the one open eye, you can not tell the difference between looking in the display and looking into a high end mirror reflecting a vibrant image. Granted maybe 32K will be ok to view provided the other factors of brightness, contrast, triplet colour representation are all improved. But bottom line is, for computer monitor, 4k is still very grainy, and has a long way to go to be real life. Also 4k monitors are very inexpensive now, based on what you get (600$), for TV's in > 40" category, yeah they are pretty expensive I would bet as they are not as common. 4k is even out on small screen laptop monitors now (lenovo, etc). You may scoff at 8k now, but you will be laughing 10 years from now having a 16-32K display and looking back wondering what you were thinking :)</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:'courier new',monospace;font-size:small"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:'courier new',monospace;font-size:small">-tl</div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Aug 14, 2016 at 10:40 AM, Brad Rodriguez <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:brad@bradrodriguez.com" target="_blank">brad@bradrodriguez.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">It depends on the size of the screen and how far you sit from it.  Within<br>
a 60-degree viewing angle, most people resolve between 4 and 7<br>
megapixels.<br>
<a href="http://www.red.com/learn/red-101/eyesight-4k-resolution-viewing" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://www.red.com/learn/red-<wbr>101/eyesight-4k-resolution-<wbr>viewing</a><br>
<br>
An 8K x 4K display would be 32 megapixels, which is a bit excessive.<br>
<br>
Cheers,<br>
Brad<br>
<span class="im HOEnZb"><br>
On Sun, 14 Aug 2016 10:19:41 -0400<br>
Logan Streondj <<a href="mailto:streondj@gmail.com">streondj@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
<br>
> Yea, I think like Concord there are limits.<br>
> People don't need to see at such high resolution,<br>
> or fly faster than the speed of sound.<br>
><br>
> 720p is the most my computers/monitors can handle, and it's definitely<br>
> enough. Buying 8k or even 4k equipment can be rather expensive.<br>
<br>
<br>
</span><span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888">--<br>
<a href="mailto:brad@bradrodriguez.com">brad@bradrodriguez.com</a><br>
</font></span><div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5"><br>
______________________________<wbr>_________________<br>
Group mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Group@bglug.ca">Group@bglug.ca</a><br>
<a href="http://bglug.ca/mailman/listinfo/group_bglug.ca" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://bglug.ca/mailman/<wbr>listinfo/group_bglug.ca</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br></div>